google.com, pub-7903114624318175, DIRECT, f08c47fec0942fa0 More Inga Moore illustrations from the book Wind in the Willows | Content in a Cottage

Saturday, August 24, 2013

More Inga Moore illustrations from the book Wind in the Willows






I found more illustrations by Inga Moore from Wind in the Willows on this blog. I only posted a few but there are lots more if you click on that link. You all know how much I adore interior design by animals. Now I adore her artwork and imagination. Have a great weekend.
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7 comments:

Bonnie said...

Rosemary I love the muted colors. Lovely!

Gail, northern California said...

I wonder how she does that. Can't be but it almost looks as though her painting technique involves hundreds of dots.

Such a cozy room in the first picture. I could sit in that chair before that fire grate very easily. Adorable picture where the badger is applying first aid to the little one too.

Thanks, Rosemary. Most kind of you.

Content in a Cottage said...

Gail...
I think those dots are from the printing process. I think the illustrations were photographed from a book.

tammy j said...

i cannot thank you enough for this post and this link.
my book's illustrations are not hers. and it makes me want to acquire hers. XO !!

Karen said...

It makes me wish it was cold enough to have a fire in the fireplace...so cozy and charming. I love these images and will head over to the site you've linked and look at more...they make me smile.
Thank you,
Karen

Candice said...

OOOOOH, yeah! Inga Moore's work is very inviting. So, now I'll collect her kids' lit along with Quentin Blake's. Here I come Amazon.

Unknown said...

Hi, Inga works on tracing paper and scratches back then does something else before committing to the colouring of each. Yes, it is painstaking, her health suffers in order to meet a deadline and she works with coloured pencils with other mediums, basically whatever is needed. She has her methods that are definitely not doing lots of tiny dots. :-) it's the texture of the paper. There are other secrets that shall remain hidden. Only to do such work you must keep your coloured pencils sharp. Not the printing process at all.