Saturday, May 5, 2012

Mystery Flower at My Cottage

 
 

These were taken today on an overcast morning with my iPad. What are those stunning magenta flowers and how did they get there? They are very large and have popped up in an area that never gets mowed and is allowed to grow wild behind the tall grasses in the second photo and near the buttercups that grow in huge patches near my metal gate. Click to enlarge. Isn't it fun to get surprise flowers planted by birds and magic? 
I have to say my favorite photo app of late is PhotoToasterJr. I almost never use anything else. It's free too. I blogged about it recently (last Saturday 4/28) so look for the post to download.

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

This is a large flowered clematis-I do not know the cultivar.

Anonymous said...

Hello Rosemary~ warm greetings from Washington state! I've never commented on your blog, but I visit you everyday. I believe that your beautiful magenta flowers come from a clematis vine....possibly one called nelly moser. A google search might help identify. Give webster hugs for me, warmly, Laurie

Marilyn said...

a mystery no more...Rosemary, that's a Clematis vine growing there in the weeds...they will bloom every year now if left alone...what a lovely surprise for you...

ladyhawthorne said...

Yup clematis! They come in all sorts of colors and are just stunning.
I love volunteers too, always a nice surprise.

Bonnie said...

I agree with everyone else it is a clematis. How it arrived? I don't think they spread by seed. But....what do I know???? Happy Weekend. Bonnie

Karen said...

Okay, your readers are right, that is clematis...I just lost one...amazing that in your neck of the woods they nearly grow wild! :-)
Karen

Anonymous said...

Clematis indeed grows by seed...Creeping Buttercup, sc. Ranunculus repens is the yellow flower and it can be very invasive.

coasterkim said...

Yep, it's a Clematis and I just love them! They are so easy to grow!

Anonymous said...

Buttercups are lovely; I have to pull them from our pastures since they are poisonous to livestock. I agree on the Nelly Moser variety - aren't you lucky!

I love your blog and have become a daily visitor. Thank you for all of your effort and time.

- Emma in Washington